Beyond NATO: A New Security Architecture for Eastern Europe

April 04, 2018
Location:
1302 International Affairs BuildingSchool of International and Public Affairs420 West 118th StreetNew York City
Speaker(s):
Michael O'Hanlon moderated by Dr. Richard Betts

 

Western nations should negotiate a new security architecture for eastern Europe to stabilize the region and reduce the risks of war with Russia.  This new security approach would revolve around permanent neutrality for Finland and Sweden; Ukraine, Moldova, and Belarus:  Georgia, Armenia, and Azerbaijan; and finally Cyprus plus Serbia, as well as possibly several other Balkan states.  These countries could still join economic and political groups as desired.  Russia would have to settle “frozen” and “simmering” conflicts as part of the arrangement.  Discussion on the new framework should begin within NATO, followed by deliberation with the neutral countries themselves, and then formal negotiations with Russia.

 

With the author Michael O’Hanlon

Senior Fellow and Director of Research Foreign Policy Program,

Brookings Institution

 

Moderated by Dr. Richard Betts

Leo A. Shifrin Professor of War and Peace Studies, Professor of International and Public Affairs; Director, Arnold A. Saltzman Institute of War and Peace Studies

 

Wednesday, April 4, 2018

12:15 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.

1302 International Affairs Building

School of International and Public Affairs

420 West 118th Street

New York City

“Western nations should negotiate a new security architecture for eastern Europe to stabilize the region and reduce the risks of war with Russia.  This new security approach would revolve around permanent neutrality for Finland and Sweden; Ukraine, Moldova, and Belarus:  Georgia, Armenia, and Azerbaijan; and finally Cyprus plus Serbia, as well as possibly several other Balkan states.  These countries could still join economic and political groups as desired.  Russia would have to settle “frozen” and “simmering” conflicts as part of the arrangement.  Discussion on the new framework should begin within NATO, followed by deliberation with the neutral countries themselves, and then formal negotiations with Russia.”